What is a chronotype?

A Chronotype is an attribute of human beings, reflecting at what time of the day their physical functions (hormone level, body temperature, cognitive faculties, eating and sleeping) are active, change or reach a certain level. This phenomenon is commonly reduced to sleeping habits only, referring to people as "larks" and "owls" which refer, respectively, to morning people (those who wake up early and are most alert in the first part of the day) and evening people (those who are most alert in the late evening hours and prefer to go to bed late).

What is the Chronotype project?

We got interested in the science of human circadian rhythms and chronotypes when developing our production Black Tonic back in 2008.
We wanted to introduce this science to more people in a fun, accessible way.
We dreamed up the Chronotype project as a way to do this.
Users complete a short quiz at http://chronotype.co.uk, and their answers will determine which of 5 bird-based profiles (Extreme Lark, Lark, Owlark, Owl, Extreme Owl) they are allocated. A bespoke badge featuring specially commissioned illustrations is then printed by our friendly Little Printer, which can then be worn by the delegate.
Designed for conferences, the badges will act as a fun icebreaker, and make that inevitable arrivals, coffee and networking session more bearable.

About The Other Way Works

www.theotherwayworks.co.uk
twitter.com/theotherwayworks

The Other Way Works creates playful theatre that immerses our audiences in the story.
We are part of a new wave of theatre makers re-inventing the way people engage with culture, using real world spaces and emerging technologies.
The intimate scenarios we create offer our audiences agency, which can provoke them to change the way they live their lives.

Credits

Winner of the Hello Culture 2014 Open Data Award
Commissioned by Creative PIE 2014 on behalf of Creative Enterprise

Produced by The Other Way Works
Creative Director: Katie Day
Developer: Ed Porteous
Bird Illustrations by: Luke Thrush
Scientific Inspiration and Advice: Prof Debra Skene, University of Surrey